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In-Situ Multi-Spacecraft and Remote Imaging Observations of the First CME Detected by Solar Orbiter and its Geomagnetic Impact

Emma Davies - Imperial College London, United Kingdom; Christian Möstl - Space Research Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Graz, Austria; Mathew Owens - University of Reading, United Kingdom; Timothy Horbury - Imperial College London, United Kingdom; Robert Forsyth - Imperial College London, United Kingdom; Helen O'Brien - Imperial College London, United Kingdom; Vincent Evans - Imperial College London, United Kingdom; Virginia Angelini - Imperial College London, United Kingdom; Andreas Weiss - Space Research Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Graz, Austria; Martin Reiss - Space Research Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Graz, Austria; Rachel Bailey - Space Research Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Graz, Austria; Tanya Amerstorfer - Space Research Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Graz, Austria; Jürgen Hinterreiter - Space Research Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Graz, Austria; Ute Amerstorfer - Space Research Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Graz, Austria; Maike Bauer - Space Research Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Graz, Austria; Werner Magnes - Space Research Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Graz, Austria

Session: Interplanetary CMEs and Solar Particle Events


Abstract

On April 19th 2020 a CME was detected by Solar Orbiter at a heliocentric distance of about 0.8 AU. The CME was also observed in-situ on April 20th by the Wind spacecraft, with a longitudinal separation of less than 5° between Solar Orbiter and the Earth. Geomagnetic conditions at Earth reached minor storm levels with the event registering a minimum Dst index of -59 nT.

The configuration of Solar Orbiter and STEREO-A has provided an exceptionally clean link between remote imaging and in-situ observations of the CME. The CME was launched on 15th April and was very well observed in STEREO-A HI images. These images are useful in determining the global shape of the CME, which shows a clear flattening of the cross-section during its propagation.

We use the in-situ observations of the magnetic field at Solar Orbiter to predict the Dst index at L1 and compare with observations at Wind to analyse the large-scale properties of the CME. We also compare in-situ results to those predicted using remote observations and modelling of the flux rope, providing a global picture of the CME as it propagated from the Sun to 1 AU.



Approaching deadlines:

Registration opens:

16 July 2020

Abstract submission opens:

16 July 2020

European Space Weather Medals:

6 September 2020

Registration deadline:

25 September 2020

Registration deadline: [extended]

10 October 2020

Abstract submission deadline:

4 September 2020